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CJC-1295

CJC-1295 is also known as drug affinity complex:growth hormone-releasing factor (DAC:GRF). It’s a synthetic analogue of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and is primarily used to boost blood levels of growth hormone by up to ten times its normal capacity. Because CJC-1295 has similar structure with GHRH, it has the ability to stimulate the pituitary gland to release growth hormone as well as other anabolic hormones such as insulin-like growth factor 1. For this reason, many bodybuilders and athletes use CJC-1295 in order to improve muscle mass and strength, as well as performance. Originally, CJC-1295 and other synthetic peptides (compounds consisting of two or more amino acids linked in a chain) were commonly prescribed by medical professionals to treat patients suffering from muscle wasting, growth disorders, and burn injuries. Today, CJC-1295 is still widely prescribed in the treatment of these disorders because of its minimal side effects.

Overall Health Benefits of CJC-1295

  • Improves Muscle Mass and Strength [1-38]
  • Promotes Weight Loss [39-57]
  • Improves Sleep Quality [58-84]
  • Improves Cognitive Function [85-98]
  • Maintains Healthy Skeletal Frame [99-142]
  • Improves Mood and Energy Levels [143-168]
  • Improves Sex Drive and Sexual Function [169-206]
  • Enhances Tissue Regeneration [207-233]
  • Strengthens the Immune System [234-260]
  • Improves Women Fertility [263]

How CJC-1295 Works

CJC-1295 stimulates the pituitary gland to release growth hormone (GH). In order to ensure balance (homeostasis), the body still releases growth hormone in pulses. Unfortunately, with advancing age, your growth hormone levels will gradually decline until you feel its negative effects. Hence, being able to combat the effects of aging by boosting growth hormone levels through CJC-1295 supplementation can help you stay active and healthy.

Proven Health Benefits of CJC-1295

By increasing the blood levels of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), CJC-1295 exerts its anti-aging and other beneficial effects on various organ systems. An overwhelming body of clinical research supports the safety and efficacy of CJC-1295:

Improves Muscle Mass and Strength

CJC-1295 is known to greatly enhance muscle strength by increasing lean muscle mass. Studies show that this powerful peptide can boost the production of muscle cells:

  • In normal adult subjects, CJC-1295 administration improves muscle mass and strength by increasing protein synthesis. [1]
  • In healthy adults, subcutaneous administration of CJC-1295 safely and effectively increases GH and IGF-1 levels, resulting in an increase in muscle mass and strength. [2]
  • By increasing GH and IGF-1 levels, CJC-1295 significantly improves muscle mass and strength in both men and women. [3-36]
  • In mice, treatment with once-daily administration of CJC-1295 is able to maintain normal body composition as well as muscle mass. [37-38]

Promotes Weight Loss

Studies show that CJC-1295 can promote weight loss by decreasing body fat and increasing lean muscle mass:

    • In obese patients, CJC-1295 promotes fat loss by increasing the levels of growth hormone. [39-42]
    • In healthy adults, subcutaneous administration of CJC-1295 safely and effectively increases GH and IGF-1 levels, resulting in a significant reduction in body fat percentage and body mass index (BMI). [43]
    • In women, use of synthetic growth hormone CJC-1295 reduces body weight. [44]

In both men and women, CJC-1295 reduces body weight by boosting growth hormone levels. [45-56]

  • In mice, treatment with once-daily administration of CJC-1295 improves body composition by preventing fat accumulation. [57]

 

Improves Sleep Quality

CJC-1295 is instrumental in regulating sleep quantity and quality by balancing body hormones. Studies show that this powerful peptide can help you get a restful sleep:

  • CJC-1295 improves sleep quality and quantity by promoting slow wave sleep, also known as deep sleep stage. [58]
  • Once-daily administration of CJC-1295 normalizes the GHRH response, which in turn induces significantly deeper sleep. [59]
  • By increasing GH levels, CJC-1295 significantly improves deep sleep stage. [60-65]
  • In patients with insomnia, administration of delta sleep-inducing peptide such as CJC-1295 is associated with higher sleep efficiency and shorter sleep latency (amount of time it takes to fall asleep). [66]
  • In men, administration of GHRH such as CJC-1295 promotes deep sleep by enhancing stage 2 sleep. [67]
  • In normal men, administration of GHRH such as CJC-1295 is associated with a 10-fold increase in slow wave sleep. [68]
  • As a growth hormone-releasing factor, CJC-1295 induces sleep by activating sleep regulatory neurons in the brain. [69-70]
  • In patients with schizophrenia, a chronic and severe mental disorder that alters cognition, emotion, and behavior, administration of GHRH such as CJC-1295 improves sleep efficiency. [71]
  • CJC-1295 increases non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and enhances EEG slow-wave activity (SWA). [72-83]
  • In rats, injection of GHRH such as CJC-1295 effectively promotes sleep. [84]

Improves Cognitive Function

There is increasing scientific evidence that GHRH like CJC-1295 can help combat cognitive impairment associated with advancing age and other medical conditions:

  • In adults with mild cognitive impairment and healthy older adults, GHRH treatment significantly improves verbal memory. [85]
  • In healthy older adults, GHRH supplementation ameliorates cognitive impairment associated with aging and Alzheimer’s disease. [86]
  • In adults with mild cognitive impairment, GHRH supplementation improves cognitive function by boosting the levels of brain chemicals such as Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG). [87]
  • In older adults, GHRH supplementation improves various aspects of cognitive function. [88]
  • In adults with mild cognitive impairment, GHRH supplementation slows cognitive decline. [89-90]
  • CJC-1295 improves cognitive function through its neuroprotective effect, allowing it to prevent damage to nerve cells in the brain. [91-92]
  • In adults who are at increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia, GHRH administration has favorable effects on cognitive function. [93]
  • In rats with traumatic brain injury, GHRH administration appears to improve cognitive function. [94-98]

Maintains Healthy Skeletal Frame

GHRH like CJC-1295 goes beyond maintaining lean muscle mass and strength. Strong scientific evidence suggests that this powerful peptide plays an integral part in maintenance of bone health and prevention of bone disorders such as osteoporosis and fractures:

  • In men with HIV-related fat accumulation, GHRH administration improves bone metabolism and bone density, suggesting that CJC-1295 can correct various bone disorders. [99]
  • In elderly postmenopausal women with decreased bone mass, treatment with GHRH stimulates bone metabolism. [100]
  • In healthy elderly women, GHRH administration prevents bone breakdown by increasing the blood levels of bone formation markers. [101]
  • In patients with primary and secondary osteoporosis, GHRH administration increases bone formation and activity of bone cells (osteoblasts). [102]
  • In women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, GHRH administration accelerates bone metabolism and activity of osteoblasts. [103-113]
  • In men with osteoporosis of unknown cause, boosting GH levels through GHRH administration significantly improves bone mineral density (BMD). [114-115]
  • In GH-deficient adults with osteoporosis, GHRH administration increases BMD and markers of bone formation and decreases markers of bone breakdown. [116-118]
  • In patients with fractures, GHRH administration accelerates fracture healing. [119]
  • In mice, CJC-1295 administration helps normalize bone growth in the legs. [120]
  • By increasing GH levels, CJC-1295 significantly lowers one’s risk of osteoporosis, fractures, and other bone disorders. [121-142]

Improves Mood and Energy Levels

Because of CJC-1295’s ability to boost GH levels by up to ten times its normal capacity, it can also help improve mood and energy levels in people suffering from depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders. There is compelling evidence supporting the beneficial effects of CJC-1295 on mood:

  • Several studies show that low blood levels of growth hormone are strongly linked with depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders, suggesting that administration of GHRH such as CJC-1295 may help improve mood and energy levels by boosting GH production in the body. [143-156]
  • In adults with mild cognitive impairment and healthy older adults, GHRH administration has favorable effects on cognition and mood. [157]
  • In patients with major depression, GHRH administration increases GH levels, resulting in reduction of depressive symptoms. [158]
  • In patients with major depression, GHRH administration improves energy levels by decreasing sleepiness. [159]

In patients with depression, GHRH administration significantly improves mood and energy levels by increasing the levels of neurotransmitters (brain chemicals) such as noradrenaline, dopamine, and acetylcholine. [160-168]

Improves Sex Drive and Sexual Function

Because CJC-1295 has similar structure with GHRH, it can stimulate the pituitary gland to release various hormones that are involved in the regulation of sex drive. Studies show that by boosting the levels of anabolic hormones such as growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), CJC 1295 may help ramp up sexual power and fight sexual dysfunction:

  • Studies show that growth hormone deficiency is strongly linked with low libido and erectile dysfunction, suggesting that increasing GH levels through CJC-1295 supplementation may have beneficial effects on sex drive and sexual function. [169-176]
  • Studies also show that IGF-1 deficiency is strongly linked with low libido and erectile dysfunction, suggesting that CJC-1295 supplementation may help improve sexual function. [177-183]
  • In age-advanced men, GHRH supplementation significantly improves libido and general well-being. [184]
  • By increasing GH and IGF-1 levels, CJC-1295 also increases the levels of nitric oxide, a molecule naturally produced in the body which plays an integral part in penile erection. [185-193]
  • CJC-1295 administration improves sex drive and sexual function by increasing GH levels, which in turn boosts the levels of the primary male sex hormone testosterone and the primary female sex hormone estrogen. [194-195]
  • Studies show that peptides such as CJC-1295 are involved in the erection process and sexual arousal. [196-205]
  • In animal models, GHRH administration increases testicular responsiveness and receptors. [206]

Enhances Tissue Regeneration

CJC-1295 can indirectly improve tissue regeneration of almost all body systems. Studies show that by stimulating the pituitary gland to release two vital hormones, GH and IGF-1, CJC-1295 may accelerate tissue repair after an injury:

  • GH repairs damaged tissues by stimulating the collagen synthesis in human tendon and skeletal muscle. [207]
  • IGF-1 has a potential role in enhancing stem cell repair after a kidney injury. [208]
  • Both GH and IGF-1 play a role in brain repair after an injury. [209-218]
  • Both GH and IGF-1 accelerate tissue repair by increasing collagen synthesis. [219-220]
  • As a GHRH, CJC-1295 accelerates the wound healing process by promoting formation of protective covering of damaged skin tissues. [221-223]
  • Recent evidence also demonstrates that CJC-1295 and other GHRHs can induce heart repair after myocardial infarction, by mechanisms involving a direct action on the heart cells (cardiomyocytes). [224-225]
  • GHRH promotes tissue regeneration by stimulating the proliferation of the cells of the pancreas while preventing programmed cell death (apoptosis). [226]
  • GHRH administration accelerates repair of tissue injury by increasing the number of cells needed for regeneration at the site of injury. [227-232]
  • GHRH administration can also help improve healing of debilitating injuries such as Achilles tendon rupture. [233]

Strengthens the Immune System

As a GHRH, CJC-1295 also possesses strong immune-modulating properties necessary for combating a wide array of infections and chronic diseases:

  • In older men and women with compromised immune function, GHRH administration has profound immune-enhancing effects as evidenced by an increase in B and T cells of the immune system. [234]
  • In animal models, GHRH injection increases the numbers of CD2, T-cells, and CD4 cells of the immune system. [235-237]
  • GHRHs such as CJC-1295 strengthen the immune system by regulating the activities of natural killer cells and T cells. [238-241]
  • In animal models, GHRH administration for 6 months increases the production of antibodies. [242]
  • By increasing GH levels, CJC-1295 improves various aspects of the immune function. [243-246]
  • By boosting the levels of IGF-1, CJC-1295 also help regulate immune function. [247-256]
  • GHRH administration can also help fight inflammatory diseases by significantly reducing the levels of inflammatory substances in the body. [257-259]
  • GHRH also has the ability to prevent the progression of tumors. [260]

Improves Women Fertility

  • Strong scientific evidence suggests that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and growth hormone can improve fertility by regulating the ovarian follicular cycle. [261-262] This led to the conclusion that GH-releasing factor (GRF) like CJC-1295 can induce ovulation.
  • Interestingly, one cell study investigated the effects of GRF on the ovulation cycle. [263] Results from the study showed that cells treated with GRF had a significant increase in both follicular fluid IGF-1 levels and blood levels of GH, which in turn induced superovulation. This indicates a possible direct effect of GRF like CJC-1295 in infertile patients.

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