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Hydergine (Ergoloid Mesylates)

Hydergine (Ergoloid Mesylates)

Hydergine (Ergoloid Mesylates) belongs to the family of medicines known as ergot alkaloid, which are group of compounds produced by fungi in the genus Claviceps. This brain booster is consists of methanesulfonate salts from three dihydrogenated ergot alkaloids. As a pharmaceutical drug, is used to treat mood or behavioral disorders, problems caused by Alzheimer’s disease, age-related cognitive impairments, and stroke.

Overall Health Benefits of Hydergine (Ergoloid Mesylates)

  • Improves Cognitive Function and Brain Health [3-16]
  • Improves Symptoms of Stroke [103-107]
  • Treats Tardive Dyskinesia [108-111]
  • Wards Off Depression and Anxiety [112-125]
  • Fights Fatigue [126-127]
  • Treats Hearing Loss [128]
  • Reduces Vertigo [129-130]
  • Promotes Restful Sleep [131-133]
  • Treats Headaches and Body Pains [134-141]
  • Lowers Blood Pressure [142-143]

How does Hydergine Works?

Hydergine exerts its brain-boosting effects by increasing the levels of the neurotransmitters (brain chemicals) dopamine and serotonin – both of which plays an integral role in the maintenance of cognitive function. [1-2] In addition, another important mechanism by which hydergine improves cognitive health is by boosting blood flow within the brain.

Proven Health Benefits of Hydergine

The components of hydergine are derived from potent neurochemicals and have undergone decades of testing and research. The following are among the proven health benefits of hydergine:

Improves Cognitive Function and Brain Health

Strong scientific evidence suggests that hydergine can help improve various aspects of cognitive function such as memory and thinking skills:

  1. In patients with possible Alzheimer’s dementia, supplementation with daily doses of hydergine at 4 mg or more improved neuropsychological measures compared to placebo.             [3-16]
  2. In elderly patients with age-related mental deterioration, administration of hydergine at 4.5 mg per day for 6 months resulted in a significant reduction in cognitive deficits, anxiety, mood depression, unsociability, and irritability. [17-19]
  3. In an analysis of multiple studies assessing the benefits of hydergine, researchers found that hydergine has positive effects on different aspects of cognitive function. [20]
  4. In healthy elderly volunteers, hydergine administration improved performances on tests of intelligence. [21-22]
  5. Studies show that hydergine improves brain health by enhancing the metabolism of cerebral ganglionic cells (brain cells), increasing the uptake of water, blood sugar and oxygen in cerebral cells, and stimulating dilation of blood vessels to improve blood circulation within the brain. [23-24]
  6. In patients with clinically significant evidence of mental aging, administration of hydergine at a dose of 3 mg per day significantly improved the severity of symptoms and intellectual function. [25-26]
  7. In patients with mild-to-moderate mental deterioration, hydergine supplementation significantly improved cognition and functioning. [27-29]
  8. Administration of a different formulation of hydergine as a liquid in a capsule in patients with cognitive impairment led to a significant improvement in symptoms. [30]
  9. In patients with chronic senile cerebral insufficiency, a rare condition characterized by obstruction of one or more arteries that supply blood to the brain, hydergine supplementation at a dose of 1.5 mg thrice a day for 6-12 months improved the severity of symptoms. [31-33]
  10. In patients with late life organic brain syndromes, a group of conditions that frequently leads to impaired cognitive function, hydergine administration resulted in improvement in mental function and symptom rating scale. [34-40]
  11. In elderly patients with cerebrovascular insufficiency, hydergine administration resulted in statistically significant improvement in symptoms with no evident side effects.                 [41-58]
  12. In patients with symptoms of primary degenerative dementia, hydergine administration at a dose of 6 mg/day improved attention and other behavioral parameters. [59-63]
  13. In elderly patients with cognitive impairment, hydergine had a statistically significant effect on cognitive status. [64]
  14. In patients with organic brain syndrome and cerebral arteriosclerosis, hydergine administration for 12 weeks is associated with greater symptomatic relief compared to placebo. [65-67]
  15. In subjects with senile mental deterioration, hydergine administration for 24 weeks improved qualitative aspects of performance such as attention and concentration. [68-73]
  16. In patients with dementia, hydergine consistently produced statistically significant improvement in 13 symptoms associated with the condition. [74-79]
  17. In patients affected by multi-infarct dementia, daily intravenous infusion of 3 mg hydergine over 14 days had a fast and clinically relevant effect on the key clinical symptoms of the disease. [80-81]
  18. In patients with chronic psychosis, a severe mental disorder characterized by impaired emotions and detachment from reality, hydergine treatment improved psychotic symptoms. [82-83]
  19. In geriatric patients with cerebrovascular disorders, administration of sublingual tablets of hydergine for twelve weeks improved cognition and intellectual function without untoward effects. [84-88]
  20. In healthy elderly men and women, hydergine administration is associated with significant improvement in physical and mental health. [89-90]
  21. In patients with Alzheimer’s disease, combination therapy with lecithin and ergoloid mesylates improved the abilities of patients to detect spatial arrangements, recognize faces, and identify new words. [90-91]
  22. In elderly patients with signs of cerebrovascular impairment, administration of hydergine at 4.5 mg daily is associated with significant improvement in mental activity and increased blood circulation in the brain. [93-94]
  23. A study assessing 26 clinical drug trials showed that hydergine treatment is effective at improving age-related cognitive dysfunction. [95]
  24. In patients aged 55 to 80 years with mild memory impairment, hydergine administration at 6 mg per day for 12 weeks enhanced short-term memory function. [96]
  25. In patients with cognitive impairment, hydergine administration improves various areas of cognitive functions as evidenced by improved electroencephalogram findings. [97-98]
  26. Studies show that hydergine is in par with Alzheimer’s drugs such as levodopa with regards to improving cognitive function related to this disease. [99]
  27. In healthy elderly men and women, hydergine treatment is associated with improved performances on tests of intelligence. [100]
  28. In patients with hardened brain arteries, hydergine administration improved a number of physical and psychological symptoms such as confusion, dizziness, orientation, fatigue, emotional stability, motivation, short-term memory, depression, anxiety, cooperation, sociability, self-care, and locomotion. [101]
  29. In patients with low oxygen levels (hypoxia), hydergine reduced brain dysfunction by improving brain electrical activity. [102]

Improves Symptoms of Stroke

A stroke is a life-threatening situation. This medical condition occurs when blood flow going to your brain is cut off, resulting in death of brain cells. Interestingly, hydergine has the ability to boost blood circulation in the brain. Studies show that this key mechanism can help accelerate recovery in stroke patients:

  1. In patients who had subarachnoid hemorrhage, intravenous hydergine administration significantly reduced stroke symptoms. [103]
  2. In elderly female patients (74 to 79 years of age) with multi-infarct dementia, hydergine injection increased brain glucose use, which is suggestive of improved brain cell activity. [104]
  3. In stroke patients, oral or intramuscular dose of hydergine improved limb function, mental deterioration, and electrical activity of the brain. [105]
  4. In an animal model of stroke, hydergine markedly reduced neuronal death following 5 minutes of restricted blood supply in the brain. [106]
  5. In rats subjected to multiple brain infarctions, hydergine reduced swelling and improved brain blood flow. [107]

Treats Tardive Dyskinesia

Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a disorder characterized by uncontrollable, repetitive body movements. This may include blinking, grimacing, lip smacking, or sticking out the tongue. There is strong scientific evidence that hydergine can help treat this debilitating medical condition:

  1. In patients with tardive dyskinesia, hydergine administration reduced repetitive body movements. [108]
  2. In patients with abnormal involuntary movements of tardive dyskinesia, hydergine treatment at a dose of 3 to 4 milligrams a day for six weeks significantly reduced symptoms. [109]
  3. In elderly chronic psychiatric patients, hydergine is associated with a reduction of dyskinetic scores compared to placebo. [110]
  4. In patients with signs of tardive dyskinesia secondary to antipsychotic medication, hydergine administration at a dose of 4.5 mg once daily for 6 weeks reduced dyskinetic scores. [111]

Wards Off Depression and Anxiety

The brain-boosting properties of hydergine do not only improve cognitive function. Several lines of evidence support its antidepressant and anti-anxiety effect:

  1. In patients with depression and dementia, hydergine administration improved depressive symptoms without adverse side effects. [112]
  2. In elderly patients with age-related mental deterioration, 4.5 mg daily dose of hydergine for 6 months improved depressive symptoms such as unsociability and irritability. [113]
  3. In aged patients with hardened brain arteries, hydergine administration improved motivation, cooperation, sociability, self-care, fatigue, and locomotion. [114]
  4. In patients with dementia, hydergine improved depressive mood. [115]
  5. In nursing home residents with organic brain syndrome, hydergine administration decreased symptoms of depression. [116]
  6. In elderly nursing home patients, hydergine treatment for 12 weeks improved motivation. [117]
  7. In patients with possible Alzheimer’s dementia, supplementation with daily doses of hydergine at 4 mg or more improved neuropsychological measures of depression. [118]
  8. A review of 26 clinical studies found that hydergine administration at varying doses had a positive effect on mood. [119]
  9. In elderly patients with age-related mental deterioration, administration of hydergine at 4.5 mg per day for 6 months resulted in a significant reduction in anxiety, mood depression, unsociability, and irritability. [120]
  10. In patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy, hydergine treatment is associated with significantly better antidepressant response. [121]
  11. In patients with alcohol-related encephalopathy, a condition that refers to brain disease, damage, or malfunction, hydergine treatment improved symptoms of depression such as sleep disturbance and agitation. [122]
  12. Results from twelve different clinical trials conducted in patients with dementia showed that hydergine significantly decreased anxiety. [123]
  13. In elderly patients with mental deterioration, hydergine administration at a dose of 4.5 mg for 6 months significantly reduced mood depression and anxiety. [124]
  14. In 16 elderly patients, hydergine administration for 3 months decreased anxiety and irritability. [125]

Fights Fatigue

Hydergine also has a potent anti-fatigue effect that can help boost energy levels. Studies show that this powerful ergot alkaloid can help combat fatigue induced by aging and other debilitating medical conditions:

  1. In aged individuals with reduced blood flow to the brain, hydergine administration reduced symptoms of fatigue. [126]
  2. A study reviewing 12 trials assessing the benefits of hydergine in dementia patients showed that the treatment significantly reduced fatigue. [127]

Treats Hearing Loss

Aging leads to hearing loss and significantly impairs one’s ability to communicate. This is because the aging process may cause changes in the inner ear structures, blood flow to the ear, and in the way your brain interprets speech and sound.

In a study of 17 patients with age-related problems of the inner ear, the researchers concluded that hydergine drops may help improve hearing by 20%. [128] All patients were treated only with hydergine at a dose of 30 drops (4.5 mg) thrice daily. Results of the study showed a 57% reduction in ringing in the ears (tinnitus) and a 20% reduction in impaired response to normal noises.

Reduces Vertigo

Vertigo is an unpleasant symptom and is characterized by a feeling that your surrounding is spinning. While some types of vertigo resolve without treatment, this condition can be a sign of an underlying medical problem of the brain or inner ear. For people with acute or chronic vertigo, studies show that hydergine exerts beneficial effects:

  1. In aged patients with decreased brain blood flow, hydergine administration reduced the occurrence of vertigo. [129]
  2. In patients with hearing loss, hydergine treatment improved symptoms of vertigo. [130]

Promotes Restful Sleep

Sleeping problems are very common in people with advancing age. The good news is that hydergine can help improve sleep quality and quantity in the elderly according to high quality studies:

  1. In aged patients with reduced blood flow in the brain, hydergine administration decreased symptoms of sleep disorders. [131]
  2. In patients with alcohol-related encephalopathy, oral hydergine administration reduced sleep disturbance and agitation. [132]
  3. In rats, hydergine injections reversed sleep disturbance induced by low oxygen levels. [133]

Treats Headaches and Body Pains

Hydergine is not only a powerful cognitive enhancer. There is increasing evidence that hydergine has potent pain-relieving properties:

  1. In patients who experienced migraines, hydergine use significantly reduced the frequency of headache attacks, days with a headache, and consumption of painkillers. [134]
  2. In patients with migraines and cluster headaches, administration of sublingual hydergine tablets at a dose of 0.5 mg reduced symptoms by increasing blood flow to the brain. [135]
  3. One study found that hydergine and other ergot alkaloids are in par with pain relievers for the treatment of headaches. [136]
  4. In patients with headaches secondary to vascular deficiency, hydergine treatment relieved symptoms. [137]
  5. Hydergine administration in patients with vasomotor headache, a type of headache that occurs during abrupt position changes, reduced the frequency and intensity of headaches. [138]
  6. In patients with pain associated with sickle cell crisis, hydergine administration reduced pain intensity without adverse side effects. [139]
  7. Hydergine administration also reduced pain in patients with painful posttraumatic osteoporosis. [140]
  8. Hydergine was also effective in the treatment of patients with painful shoulder and shoulder-band syndrome. [141]

Lowers Blood Pressure

Ergot alkaloids also possess anti-hypertensive properties. Studies show that ergot alkaloids can help reduce blood pressure to normal limits without any adverse side effects:

  1. In patients aged 25 to 56 years, oral and intravenous administration of the dihydrogenated ergot alkaloids significantly reduced blood pressure without side effects. [142]
  2. In patients with arterial hypertension, hydergine reduced blood pressure by dilating blood vessels. [143]

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