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ibutamoren MK-677

MK-677, also known as ibutamoren or ibutamoren mesylate, belongs to a group called growth hormone secretagogues. They are substances that boost the production of growth hormone (GH). MK-677 can also increase the production of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a hormone similar in molecular structure and function to insulin. The ability of MK-677 to boost the levels of GH and IGF-1 is associated with a wide array of health benefits. The exact mechanism by which MK-677 exerts these effects is by mimicking the action of ghrelin (hunger hormone) and binding to one of the ghrelin receptors (GHSR) in the brain. [1] Interestingly, GHSR is located in certain regions of the brain that regulate appetite, mood, pleasure, and cognitive function. [2] Because of this, researchers believe that MK-677 can have beneficial effects on these functions. In addition, MK-677 is also classified as a selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM), a class of therapeutic compounds similar in function with anabolic agents, but with lesser side effects. This makes MK-677 a safe and effective form of GH and IGF-1 replacement therapy.

Overall Health Benefits of MK-677

  • Improves Muscle Mass and Promotes Fat Loss [3-26]
  • Maintains Healthy Skeletal Frame [27-56]
  • Improves Sleep Quality [57-81]
  • Improves Cognitive Function [82-136]
  • Accelerates Wound Healing and Tissue Regeneration [137-150]
  • Maintains a Healthy Heart [151-202]
  • Strengthens the Immune System [203-240]
  • Improves Sex Drive and Sexual Function [241-273]
  • Improves Blood Sugar Levels [273-308]
  • Improves Cholesterol Profile [309-332]

Proven Health Benefits of MK-677

There is an overwhelming body of clinical evidence supporting the diverse health benefits of MK-677 on almost every organ system in the body:

Improves Muscle Mass and Promotes Fat Loss

MK-677 is frequently used as an anabolic substance, which means that it has the ability to increase muscle mass and strength while promoting fat loss. Studies show that this powerful compound can help improve body composition and prevent muscle wasting related to old age and other medical conditions:

  • In obese males, oral treatment with MK-677 increases fat-free mass by boosting basal metabolic rate (BMR), the rate at which the body uses energy while at rest. [3]
  • Several high quality studies show that higher GH levels are strongly linked with increased muscle mass and strength in the elderly, suggesting that MK-677 supplementation may have positive effect. [4-13]
  • Several lines of evidence also suggest that higher IGF-1 levels are associated with increased muscle mass and strength in the older population. [14-22]
  • In patients with muscle wasting, MK-677 reverses diet-induced nitrogen wasting without any clinically adverse side effects. [23]
  • In patients recovering from hip fracture, MK-677 treatment improves gait speed and stair climbing power, which is suggestive of improved muscle function. [24]
  • In healthy older adults, 12 months of MK-677 treatment significantly increases fat-free mass without any adverse side effects. [25]
  • In GH-deficient adults, MK-677 administration improves body composition by increasing IGF-1 levels. [26]

Maintains Healthy Skeletal Frame

Aside from improving body composition, MK-677 also has the ability to maintain healthy bones and prevent various bone disorders such as osteoporosis and fractures. There is strong scientific evidence supporting the beneficial effects of MK-677 on overall bone health:

  • In healthy obese male, MK-677 treatment for 2 weeks improves bone turnover (total volume of bone formed and broken down). [27]
  • In elderly adults (65 years or older), oral MK-677 treatment daily for 2 weeks improves bone building by increasing osteocalcin, a marker of bone turnover. [28]
  • In postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, MK-677 treatment for 12 months improves bone mineral density in the femoral neck. [29]
  • In healthy and functionally impaired elderly adults, once daily dosing with MK-677 stimulates bone turnover. [30]
  • In patients recovering from hip fracture, MK-677 treatment is associated with fewer falls and improved functional measures. [31]
  • MK-677 improves bone health by increasing the activity of osteoblasts (bone cells). [32]
  • By increasing GH levels, MK-677 can significantly lower the risk of osteoporosis, fractures, and other bone disorders. 33-45]
  • By boosting IGF-1 levels, MK-677 also helps lower the prevalence of various bone disorders. [46-56]

Improves Sleep Quality

The aging population is highly at risk for sleeping problems and disorders that can significantly affect their quality of life. Whether it is age-related or caused by a certain medical condition, MK-677 supplementation may help improve sleep quality and quantity according to numerous clinical research:

  • In both younger and elderly subjects, MK-677 treatment for 14 days improves sleep quality by increasing rapid eye movement (REM) sleep duration by 50%. [57]
  • In healthy older adults, oral administration of MK-677 (25 mg) once daily improves Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, a measure of sleep. [58]
  • In normal men, administration of growth hormone secretagogue increases slow-wave sleep (SWS), which is often referred to as deep sleep. [59]
  • In young healthy men, intravenous injections of growth hormone secretagogue during sleep consistently stimulate slow-wave sleep, suggesting that MK-677 may help improve sleep quality. [60]
  • In normal young males, growth hormone secretagogue administration increases stage 2 sleep. [61]
  • Higher GH levels are strongly associated with improved deep sleep stage, indicating that MK-677 supplementation may have positive effect on sleep. [62-67]
  • Higher IGF-1 levels are also linked with better sleep, suggesting that MK-677 supplementation may have beneficial effects. [68-78]
  • Studies on rats show that growth hormone secretagogue administration activates sleep regulatory neurons in the brain. [79]
  • In obese patients, growth hormone secretagogue administration improves stage 2 sleep by reversing GH deficiency. [80-81]

Improves Cognitive Function

Doctors usually prescribe MK-677 for patients suffering from cognitive impairment because of its nootropic effects. Nootropics are drugs, supplements, and other substances that have the ability to improve certain aspects of cognitive function such as learning, memory, creativity, and motivation. Several high quality studies support the many beneficial effects of MK-677 as a cognitive enhancer:

 

  • By increasing REM sleep duration and sleep quality, MK-677 improves cognitive function. [82-83]
  • In older adults, administration of growth hormone secretagogues improves short-term memory and active problem-solving skills, suggesting that MK-677 may also exert beneficial effects on cognitive function. [84]
  • In adults with mild cognitive impairment and healthy older adults, 20 weeks of growth hormone secretagogue administration improves executive function and verbal memory. [85]
  • MK-677 improves various aspects of cognitive function by increasing IGF-1 levels. [86-90]
  • With increased IGF-1 levels, the body activates intracellular pathways involved in the protection of nerve cells in the brain. [91-108]
  • MK-677 also protects brain cells against programmed cell death (apoptosis) by increasing ghrelin levels, which in turn prevents cognitive decline. [109-114]
  • MK-677 improves cognitive function and prevents age-related cognitive decline by increasing the levels of GH. [115-129]
  • Administration of growth hormone secretagogues improves cognitive function by increasing the levels of brain chemicals such as gamma-Aminobutyric acid and N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate. [130]
  • In healthy older adults, administration of growth hormone secretagogues helps combat age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. [131]
  • In rat models of Alzheimer’s disease, MK-677 administration reduces the formation of abnormal proteins known as amyloid beta (causative agent of AD). [132]
  • SARMs such as MK-677 stimulate growth and development of brain tissues, enhance communication of nerve cells (neurons), and promote brain cell survival. [133-136]

Accelerates Wound Healing and Tissue Regeneration

Growth hormone secretagogues such as MK-677 have the ability to accelerate repair of damaged tissues caused by physical trauma or sports-related injuries. There is compelling evidence supporting the regenerative properties of MK-677:

  • By boosting GH levels, MK-677 accelerates the migration of cells into the injured or damaged tissues, thus speeding up the wound healing process. [137-139]
  • MK-677 can also speed up the wound healing process by increasing skin thickness. [140]
  • MK-677 speeds up wound healing by increasing wound collagen content, granulation tissue and wound tensile strength. [141-143]
  • MK-677 increases IGF-1 levels, which in turn stimulates wound healing by increasing cell proliferation and collagen synthesis. [144-147]
  • In mice, SARMs administration also prevents damage to the central nervous system and improves regeneration by reducing inflammatory substances. [148]
  • In rats, growth hormone secretagogue administration improves functional recovery after various injuries by stimulating the formation of new neuronal cells. [149]
  • In mice, administration of growth hormone secretagogue enhances healing of skin wounds resulting from trauma, surgery, or disease. [150]

Maintains a Healthy Heart

Heart disease ranks among the top in terms of mortality worldwide. Interestingly, MK-677 possesses potent cardioprotective properties that can help reduce the prevalence of heart disease and rate of deaths associated with this condition. Recent research shows that MK-677 and other growth hormone secretagogues can help preserve heart function through various important mechanisms:

  • In obese patients, MK-677 treatment improves heart health by reducing low density lipoprotein (bad cholesterol). [151]
  • By increasing ghrelin levels, MK-677 prevents programmed cell death of cardiomyocytes (heart cells). [152-154]
  • By increasing GH levels, MK-677 significantly reduces the risk of heart disease and related deaths. [155-164]
  • By increasing IGF-1 levels, MK-677 also reduces the risk of heart disease and related deaths. [165-180]
  • MK-677 and other growth hormone secretagogues protect against myocardial infraction by activating signalling pathways responsible for self-renewal and survival of cardiac cells. [181-188]
  • MK-677 also induces cardiac repair after myocardial infarction. [189-191]
  • In animal models, MK-677 and other growth hormone secretagogues stimulate self-renewal of cardiac stem cells and promote their survival. [192-195]
  • In mice, growth hormone secretagogue administration restores electrical activity of the heart. [196]
  • In rats, growth hormone secretagogue administration protects against heart damage induced by reduced oxygen. [197-201]
  • In mice, growth hormone secretagogue administration stimulates formation of new cardiac tissues. [202]

Strengthens the Immune System

MK-677 and other growth hormone secretagogues have the ability to enhance the immune response. Studies show that they play a role in the regulation of the immune function through the following important mechanisms:

  • In humans, growth hormone secretagogues modulate the immune function through stimulation of the GH/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) axis. [203-206]
  • In the elderly, both short- and long-term growth hormone secretagogue administration increases the numbers of lymphocytes, monocytes, B-cells and T-cells. [207]
  • Growth hormone secretagogues can also modulate the immune function through brain mechanisms involved in sleep regulation. [208]
  • By increasing GH levels, MK-677 helps regulate T cell development, cytokine production, B cell development, antibody production, neutrophil adhesion, monocyte migration and anti-apoptotic action. [209-210]
  • By increasing GH levels, MK-677 also significantly lowers the risk of various diseases related to compromised immune system. 211-222]
  • By increasing IGF-1 levels, MK-677 also significantly lowers the risk of autoimmune diseases and other immune system-related disorders. [223-237]
  • By boosting ghrelin levels, MK-677 strengthens the immune system by lowering inflammation. [238]
  • In animal models, administration of growth hormone secretagogues increases the numbers of CD2+ αβ T-cells, CD25+CD4+ cells, and CD4+CD45R+ cells of the immune system. [239-240]

Improves Sex Drive and Sexual Function

The ability of MK-677 to positively influence the levels of vital hormones such as GH and IGF-1 can help improve sex drive and sexual function. There is strong scientific evidence supporting the beneficial effects of MK-677 and other growth hormone secretagogues on sexual health of both men and women:

  • MK-677 indirectly improves sexual function by increasing GH and IGF-1 levels, which in turn boosts the levels of nitric oxide, a naturally occurring substance that induces harder and longer penile erections. [241-249]
  • Another mechanism by which MK-677 improves libido is by increasing testosterone and estrogen levels, which are hormones that regulate sexual desire and sexual function. [250-251]
  • By boosting ghrelin levels, MK-677 also helps improve sexual function. [252-255]
  • A growing body of clinical evidence suggests that growth hormone deficiency is strongly linked with low libido and erectile dysfunction, suggesting that boosting GH levels through MK-677 supplementation may help ramp up sexual power. [256-264]
  • Studies also show that IGF-1 deficiency is strongly linked with low libido and erectile dysfunction, suggesting that MK-677 may have beneficial effects on sex drive and sexual function. [265-271]
  • In healthy postmenopausal women, growth hormone secretagogue supplementation improves libido without any adverse side effects. [272]
  • In age-advanced men and women, 4 months of growth hormone secretagogue supplementation improves general well-being and libido. [273]

Improves Blood Sugar Levels

MK-677 and other growth hormone secretagogues have potent anti-diabetic properties. There is compelling evidence supporting the ability of MK-677 to bring down elevated levels of blood sugar in diabetic patients and animal models:

  • In diabetic patients, MK-677 administration improves the body’s response to the effects of insulin, which in turn lowers blood sugar levels. [274]
  • In diabetic patients, MK-677 administration significantly reduces blood sugar levels by increasing GH secretion. [275]
  • MK-677 boosts IGF-1 levels, which in turn lowers blood sugar levels. [276-287]
  • MK-677 also boosts GH levels, which results in significant reduction in blood sugar levels. [288-301]
  • In diabetic rats, growth hormone secretagogue administration enhances insulin secretion, which in turn lowers blood sugar levels. [302-303]
  • In diabetic rats, pretreatment with growth hormone secretagogue improves insulin secretion and insulin reserve. [304-308]

Improves Cholesterol Profile

Chronic elevation in cholesterol levels significantly increases one’s risk of stroke, heart disease, hypertension, and other deadly diseases. According to studies, one can greatly reduce their risk for these debilitating medical conditions by reducing cholesterol levels through MK-677 supplementation:

  • In obese patients, MK-677 treatment reduces the levels of low density lipoprotein, which is known as the bad cholesterol. [309]
  • In older men and women, growth hormone secretagogue administration significantly reduces total cholesterol levels. [310]
  • In older adults, growth hormone secretagogue administration reduces low density lipoprotein levels without any adverse side effects. [311]
  • By increasing GH levels, MK-677 can help bring down elevated cholesterol levels. [312-321]
  • By boosting IGF-1 levels, MK-677 can also help reduce low density lipoprotein levels and increase high density lipoprotein (good cholesterol). [322-331]
  • In rats with abnormal cholesterol profile, growth hormone secretagogue administration reduces cholesterol levels. [332]

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At the age of 60, I look and feel better than I ever have in my entire life! Switching my health program and hormone replacement therapy regimen over to Genemedics was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made in my life! Genemedics and Dr George have significantly improved my quality of life and also dramatically improved my overall health. I hav...
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